Frequently Asked Questions

Have a question regarding your pet and it's care?

Contact us and we will be glad to answer. If it is a really good question, you might find it posted here.

There are several shots puppies and kittens require. Puppies need vaccinations for DHLP-P ("Distemper"), Corona, Rabies, Bordetella (Kennel Cough), and Lymes. Kittens need vaccinations for FVRCP-C ("Distemper"), FeLV (feline leukemia) and Rabies. As with children, several booster shots must be given so that the puppy or kitten can build up antibodies to the infections vaccinated for.

Puppies:

  • 6 weeks: DHLP-P 1
  • 9 weeks: DHLP-P 2, Corona 1
  • 12 weeks: DHLP-P 3, Corona 2, Bordetella
  • 16 weeks: DHLP-P adult, Rabies, Lymes

Kittens:

  • 6 weeks: FVRCP-C 1
  • 9 weeks: FVRCP-C 2
  • 12 weeks: FVRCP-C 3, FeLV 1
  • 16 weeks: Rabies, FVRCP-C adult, FeLV 2

To best house train your puppy, it is recommended that you purchase a small carrier or kennel that gives the puppy enough room to turn around. This carrier will become the puppies bedroom.

While at work, away from home or unable to watch the puppy, place him in his room. When able to watch the puppy, take the puppy outside after each meal and about every two hours.

When the puppy is good, praise him. As the puppy grows, he will be able to tell when he has to go outside, but until then, you must anticipate his needs.

In a spay, the ovaries and most of the uterus are removed. It is essentially an ovariohysterectomy. It is recommended to have the surgery done before the animal has its first heat (approximately 6 months of age).

When your pet comes in for surgery, she will have a blood test that screens liver function, kidney function, the electrolytes and a complete blood count. We use anesthetic that is up to human standards and patients are kept overnight for monitoring.

In a neuter, the testicles are removed and the seminal vesicles tied off. It is recommended to have the surgery done at approximately 6 months of age. Each surgery patient has a blood test that screens liver function, kidney function, the electrolytes and a complete blood count. We use anesthetic that is up to human standards and patients are kept overnight for monitoring.

dog with tartar buildup and gingivitisUnlike humans, animals do not brush their teeth. Dry pet foods help to some degree. When the animal chews on the hard food, this action displaces the tartar building up on the teeth. Some animals are more prone to dental problems. Tartar build up can lead to infections because it gives the bacteria a warm, moist environment. This bacteria can then be swallowed and may enter the bloodstream causing heart, liver and kidney diseases. The dog in the picture suffers from tartar buildup and gingivitis (inflammation of the gums).

dental cleaning procedurePrior to the procedure, patients have a blood test that tests liver and kidney function as well looks for signs of infection. A mild anesthetic is used and most patients go home the same day. Tartar and plaque are removed with an ultrasonic scaler above and below the gumline. This is followed by polishing which smooths the tooth enamel slowing any future plaque buildup. Therapy is continued at home with a round of antibiotics to ward off any bacteria loosened up by the cleaning. It is recommended to brush you pets teeth with a toothpaste and toothbrush designed for dogs and cats to prevent further buildup and to help strengthen the gums. Pet toothbrushes are ultra-soft and shaped to fit the mouth and teeth of your pet. Human toothpaste is not recommended because it contains ingredients that are not meant to be swallowed. Also, pet toothpastes come in flavors that appeal to dogs and cats, such as salmon, malt and poultry flavors.

You should have the name of the medication ready and call your doctor or

Poison Control

502-589-8222

immediately.

However, most medications for animals are low dosages and thus not harmful to humans.

You should have the name of the medication ready and call your veterinarian or

Poison Control

502-589-8222

immediately. If after hours, take your pet to an emergency animal hospital.

Some medications and household items are toxic to animals and could kill them if not treated right away. For instance, aspirin, tylenol and lilies are toxic to cats and antifreeze is toxic to most animals.

Hours

Busy lives sometimes make scheduling an appointment difficult. Take advantage of our extended early morning and evening hours or schedule your pet to be dropped off with pick-up at your convenience.

Monday - Friday

Saturday

Sunday

7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

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Appointments

502-893-5533

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Chenoweth Animal Hospital
3624 Frankfort Avenue
Louisville, KY 40207
502-893-5533

Disclaimer

Visitors are cautioned that this site is not intended to provide veterinary medical advice. Please contact your veterinarian with any health related issues your pet might have.

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